Rago X-Trem

Extra warm down sleeping bag

Durable winter bag with a perfect balance between warmth, weight and volume.

Product: Rago X-Trem

    Details

    • Weight: 1.78 kg
    • T-Lim: -25°C
    • Person length/width: 185/85 cm
    • Volume compressed: 30x22 cm (12L)

    Rago X-Trem

    Sometimes, not even a great four-season bag is enough. This bag is designed for the coldest Scandinavian winter and combines superb fit with top quality Pertex material, high quality goose down 90/10, 750 cuin / oz and a carefully calculated fill distribution.

    The fit of the Rago X-Trem is carefully designed to avoid cold spots forming. Cold spots occur when the down is flattened against the bag wall while you sleep. By extending the widest part of the bag from shoulder to hip you’ll be able to move around without cold spots forming, ensuring a good night's sleep.

    This is the bag you need when staying warm is crucial!

    • Zip:Left
    • Zip length (cm):150
    • Fill Material:750 FP RDS Goose Down 90/10
    • Fill weight (g):965
    • Net weight (kg):1.78
    • Net volume (l):0
    • T-Comf:-16
    • T-Lim:-25
    • T-Ext:-48
    • Sleeping bag person length (cm):185
    • Sleeping bag person width (cm):85
    • Gender:NoRelevance
      1. What's the european temperature rating?

        Since 2012 Helsport has used the European standard EN13537 to rate its
        sleeping bags. This standard allows comparisons amongst sleeping bags from
        different producers.

      2. What does the temperature values: TCOMF, TLIM and TEXT mean?

        It is important to know that the temperature rating is valid for an average
        person, in an average situation. When you are out hiking, no single trip is the
        same. People react differently to cold, levels of fitness can vary, and the
        surroundings will change every time.

        • TCOMF: the green zone is called the "comfort zone", and in this
          temperature range most people will be able to sleep comfortably.
        • TLIM: the yellow zone is called a "transition zone", between comfort and
          risk. Many people can sleep comfortably in this temperature range, but
          some may also start to freeze.
        • TEXT: The red zone is the "risk zone" and, in this range, a strong
          sensation of cold has to be expected. There is a risk of hypothermia. An
          average-sized woman can only tolerate this zone for six hours.
      3. Synthetic or down?

        There are no hard and fast rules here, and what type of sleeping bag is right for
        you will depend on what type of trips you’ll be using it for, your personal
        preference and your budget.

         

        High-quality down sleeping bags will always be warmer relative to their weight
        than synthetic sleeping bags. The lifespan of the two types is roughly the
        same. Down sleeping bags are more demanding with regard to correct
        maintenance and storage (they should be stored in the storage bag or hung
        up).

         

        Synthetic bags insulate better than down bags when wet. Luckily, it’s rare for a
        sleeping bag to get soaking wet, but it’s something that’s worth bearing in
        mind when choosing a sleeping bag. Regardless of how well a sleeping bag
        insulates, it’s no fun sleeping in a wet bag.

      4. Can I wash my sleeping bag?

        You certainly can wash your sleeping bag, but you shouldn’t do it too often.
        Using a sleeping bag liner that can be washed often is a good alternative.
        A sleeping bag liner does not only protect your sleeping bag, it’s also very
        comfortable and can increase the temperature limit of your sleeping bag by
        up to 8 degrees.

        Sleeping bags can be washed at 40 °C with a low spin. It’s important to use a
        detergent especially adapted for sleeping bags in order to avoid residue
        building up in the filling. Synthetic sleeping bags can be washed at 60 °C,
        although this will shorten the product’s lifespan. Again, we recommend using
        a liner instead and washing it more frequently if required.

        Always tumble-dry your sleeping bag. It’s a good idea to put some tennis balls
        or special dryer balls in the drum to help “fluff up” the bag’s filling again.